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The Body Mass Index Limits

The BMI isn’t a number to be used as a cut off. It’s more of a guide and it requires other factors in order for it to be an effective health assessment tool.

The Body Mass Index has had its fair share of troubles because it’s open to interpretation. Those who are muscular are comfortable being in the upper limits of it, and those who exercise a lot are comfortable in the lower ranges. Let’s discuss body mass index limits to avoid any confusion.

Body Mass Index Examples

I’m around 165 lbs and 6′. This brings my BMI to 22.4. My friends consider me too skinny when they look at me. In fact, I could lose more weight around the midsection and still would be healthy.

Unaccounted for here is that I could gain 18 lbs, and my BMI would still be normal at 24.8. So I would be okay?

Unfortunately, no. The extra 18 lbs would increase my metabolic disease risk, negatively impacting my heart health.

Using the BMI

There are limits to using the body mass index to monitor your health. But I use it as an assessment of my patient’s initial health.

My BMI of 22.4 is a good start. Knowing other factors, such as my cardiovascular risk factors, activity levels, and genetic factors, is essential.

The CDC states that a BMI between 18.5 to 24.9 is a “Healthy Weight range,” which isn’t true for everyone, as seen in the example above.

Other Weight Factors

I like to know how much weight my client has gained and over what period of time.

Equally important is the location of the majority of the weight. Central weight versus more spread out makes a difference.

Blood pressure, snoring scores, energy levels, basal heart rate, and heart rate variability can also be helpful when considering someone’s BMI.

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